Can you deduct IRA contributions?

It’s 2018, so it’s too late to cut your 2017 tax bill…right? Wrong. If you qualify, you can deduct all or part of a contribution to a traditional IRA made before April 17, 2018 on your 2017 tax return. If you don’t qualify for a deduction you may contribute to a Roth IRA instead. In that case, the contribution is nondeductible.

With either type of IRA, you can contribute up to $5,500 ($6,500 if you’re age 50 or older) for the 2017 tax year.

1. Traditional IRAs: The deduction for contributions phases out if your income exceeds certain levels and you participate in a 401(k) or other employer-provided retirement plan (or your spouse participates). Distributions are generally taxable, and a 10 percent penalty usually applies to distributions before age 59½.

Contribution tip: If you file your 2017 return early enough, you can use your tax refund to fund a deductible contribution. The IRS doesn’t mind as long as the IRA money is deposited by April 17.

2. Roth IRAs: The ability to contribute to a Roth IRA phases out if your income exceeds certain levels, depending on your filing status. Unlike traditional IRAs, you can never deduct Roth contributions, but distributions after age 59½ are generally exempt from tax and the 10 percent penalty.

Although there are numerous other factors to consider, you may contribute to a traditional IRA if your goal is to reduce your 2017 tax liability, while you may prefer a Roth IRA if your goal is to secure tax-exempt payouts in retirement. No matter which approach you take, the due date for contributions for the 2017 tax year is April 17, even if you obtain a filing extension.