Consider these unexpected medical deductions

It may be easier to qualify for a medical deduction in 2018 than before, assuming you’ll itemize deductions. Specifically, the threshold for deducting unreimbursed medical and dental expenses has been lowered to 7.5 percent of adjusted gross income (AGI). That means only the excess amount above the threshold is deductible.

At the same time, other tax law changes increasing the standard deduction and reducing the tax benefits of itemized deductions might complicate your tax situation. As a result, a sizable medical deduction could tilt the scales in favor of itemizing.

Look beyond typical medical deductions

Certainly, you should bunch medical expenses in 2018 when it suits your needs. But you don’t have to only count on typical costs for doctor visits and prescription drugs.

Deductions for a wide variety of less common expenses have been approved by the IRS or the courts in the past, including amounts paid for the following:

  • Acupuncture
  • Alcoholism treatment
  • Artificial teeth
  • Birth control pills
  • Breast pumps and supplies
  • Chiropractors
  • Guide dogs and other service animals
  • Hearing aids
  • Lead-based paint removal
  • Medical care for transplant donors
  • Oxygen and oxygen equipment
  • Pregnancy tests
  • Psychiatric care
  • Smoking-cessation programs
  • Special diet foods prescribed by physician
  • Telephone equipment for the disabled
  • Vasectomies
  • Wigs for mental health purposes (e.g., to compensate for loss of hair due to an illness or medical treatment)

Note that the costs may be large or small. For instance, deductions have been allowed for installing a swimming pool to alleviate the taxpayer’s asthma as well as clarinet lessons to correct a child’s overbite.

Remember that the medical deduction threshold reverts to 10 percent-of-AGI in 2019. If you expect to clear the 7.5-percent mark in 2018 and will still be itemizing, move nonemergency expenses like medical exams and dental cleanings into this year. Otherwise, defer elective expenses to 2019, when you might have a shot at a deduction.

Contact Dye & Whitcomb, Fort Collins, CO CPAs  if you’d like help determining your tax savings with your medical deductions.

How to nail down the historic structures credit

Are you thinking of renovating a building you own in an historic part of town? Before you start knocking down walls, find out if the building qualifies as an historic structure. It could result in a tax credit reducing your bill by thousands of dollars.

However, be aware that beginning in 2018 recent tax law changes affect the credits for building renovations.

Claiming the credit

While the 10 percent credit for rehabilitating buildings placed in service before 1936 is no longer available for expenses incurred after 2017, you may continue to claim a separate credit that’s equal to 20 percent of qualified expenses for renovating historic structures.

For instance, if you spend $100,000 to update a brownstone with historic character, you may be able to cut $20,000 off the cost. Under the latest tax laws, this credit must be taken ratably over five years. That means a $4,000 credit is claimed each year for five years. So it’ll take a little longer to recoup your costs.

Unlike the rehab credit, it may be easier to qualify for the historic structure credit than you think. For example, there are no age restrictions or wall retention rules. And it doesn’t have to be a place where George Washington slept or an antebellum mansion. But there are two key requirements:

  • The building must be listed on the National Register of Historic Places or located in a registered historic district and certified by the Secretary of the Interior. Currently, more than 90,000 buildings are listed.
  • The rehabilitation must be certified as retaining the original historic character (but not necessarily the original use) of the building.

Finally, certain complex transitional rules may apply to projects that were underway before 2018. Contact Dye & Whitcomb, Fort Collins CPA’s if you have questions about your renovation projects and whether or not you’re qualified to claim this credit.

How to salvage a casualty loss deduction

You’ve likely heard about the volcanic eruptions in Hawaii and how they’ve caused extensive damage to the property of several U.S. taxpayers. And as we head into hurricane and tornado seasons, other disasters are likely. Luckily, there’s a silver tax lining in the dark clouds: You may qualify for a casualty loss deduction, despite recent tax law changes.

Deduction changes starting in 2018

The casualty loss deduction has generally been suspended for 2018 through 2025, but you can still claim a loss for damage in an area formally declared as a federal disaster area. These include Hawaii during the volcano eruptions or the hurricane damage areas in the U.S. Southeast last year.

The deduction is limited to the excess unreimbursed loss above 10 percent of your adjusted gross income (AGI), after subtracting $100 for each casualty event.

Example: Your AGI is $100,000 and a severe storm resulted in $50,000 of damage to your home. If you received $30,000 in insurance proceeds, the amount eligible for the casualty loss deduction is $19,900 ($50,000 – $30,000 – $100). That means you can deduct $9,900 ($19,900 – 10 percent of AGI, or $10,000).

Note that the tax law changes don’t affect deductions for unreimbursed losses to business property — they don’t need to be in a federally declared disaster area to be deductible. Those business losses remain deductible without regard to any AGI limit or $100-per-event floor.

Special rules may apply

Individuals may take advantage of a special rule for disaster-area losses: If it suits your needs, you can choose to deduct a disaster-area loss in the tax year preceding the year of the event instead of the year the event actually occurs. As a result, you may get your tax money even sooner.

The tax perks of summer camp

Are you sending your kids to summer camp while you and your spouse work? Not only will your kids enjoy it, you will also when you see the potential tax break. If certain requirements are met, the cost of day camp qualifies for the Child and Dependent Care Credit.

How to take advantage of this summertime tax break

The Child and Dependent Care Credit may be claimed for the expense of caring for children under age 13, as long as you (and your spouse, if married) are “gainfully employed.”

For taxpayers with an adjusted gross income (AGI) above $43,000, the credit equals 20 percent of the qualified expenses. This percentage applies to the first $3,000 of qualified expenses for one child and $6,000 for two or more children. For example, for a couple with an AGI of $150,000 and two young children, the maximum credit is $1,200.

Consider these rules if you’re hoping to take advantage of the credit when your kids go off to summer camp:

  • The camp can be a specialty camp devoted exclusively to athletics, academics or some other pursuit.
  • If the camp requires payment for transporting your children back and forth, the cost qualifies for the credit. But you get no benefit from personal driving or carpooling.
  • You can’t count the cost of special uniforms or equipment toward the credit.
  • The credit is only available for day camp — not overnight camp.

Tax break alternative: If summer camp’s not happening, you may consider having your child do some summer work at your business, thereby qualifying for other tax breaks.